Whether you are buying a newly built house or newly constructed Pennsylvania commercial property, defects in the design or build quality could render it useless. An improperly built structure might be potentially dangerous to any occupants and result in a lengthy court battle over who is to blame. In virtually all construction defects cases, the property owner is the plaintiff and one or more parties contracted to design and build it are among the named defendants.

Two commonly occurring defects

Construction defects, generally, boil down to two causes. Those are design errors and workmanship errors. Design errors happen when the person or entity designing the structure makes errors that result in defective construction. Using too little rebar in a commercial floor might result in a concrete floor incapable of supporting its intended use, for example.

The workmanship also matters. If errors are made during the construction process or materials are changed without notice, the structure could become compromised and rendered unsafe and unusable. A workmanship defect is different from a design defect and, typically, falls upon the contractor who performed the construction work and any subcontractors that might have been used.

General mistakes can be fixed

While construction defects are potentially very costly and can render properties useless, errors are expected during the project. When mistakes are made and reasonable efforts are taken to correct them, then no defective work has occurred. A construction defect happens when people ignore reasonable steps that ensure safety and work quality.

Either negligence or outright intentional omissions result in defective construction and legal cases based on defective construction claims. An attorney experienced in construction defects claims can review your case and help to identify the liable parties and legal resources at your disposal.